What Is The Backstop Agreement For Northern Ireland

However, the legal council also stated that the instrument did not reduce the likelihood that the UK would be kept in the backstop if no bad faith on the part of the EU had been shown. Kit Malthouse was awarded as the organizer of an agreement between the Conservative Party`s limited factions on Brexit on 29 January 2019. [70] The proposal consisted of two parts. Plan A was the re-opening of the withdrawal agreement with the EU and the renegotiation of the backstop. Britain`s transition period would also be extended, giving more time to agree on future relations. Plan B looked like a managed ”no deal.” The Malthouse compromise was seen by some Leavers as a complement to the Graham Brady amendment: in short, it was intended to replace the backstop with another that would either allow a smooth transition to an agreement or create a triple safety net if there was no agreement. EU negotiators said the plan was unrealistic and that the Conservative party was negotiating with itself, with an EU official even calling it a ”bonker.” [71] [72] On March 13, 2019, the House of Commons voted against the Malthouse compromise by a majority of 374-164[73][74] and replaced the backstop. Under the new protocol, the whole of the UK leaves the EU customs union as a single customs territory. Northern Ireland will be included in the UK`s future trade agreements, but will not have tariffs or restrictions on goods crossing the Irish border in both directions, creating a de facto customs border in the Irish Sea with Britain. There is also a unilateral exit mechanism for the Northern Ireland Assembly to leave the protocol by a simple majority. [1] [2] [3] This new protocol has been described as ”Chequers for Northern Ireland” by some, as it is comparable to the British plan for future relations of Theresa May`s Chequers, previously rejected by the EU and criticised by Johnson.

[3] The Irish backstop was a protocol of the (un ratified) Brexit withdrawal agreement that would have kept the United Kingdom (generally) in the customs union of the European Union and Northern Ireland (in particular) on certain aspects of the European internal market until a solution was found to avoid a hard border.